Students learn about countryside conservation from Lichfield experts

Students are being given the chance to experience conservation work at first hand thanks to Lichfield District Council’s countryside team.

Chris Walsh, Lichfield District Council’s Biodiversity Officer with students from South Staffordshire College

Chris Walsh, Lichfield District Council’s Biodiversity Officer with students from South Staffordshire College

The South Staffordshire College students are studying for a National Diploma in Countryside Management at Rodbaston Campus.

And to enhance their knowledge, countryside officers have already taken the group of 17 to 21-year-olds to fragile habitats across the area, including Chasewater Country Park, Gentleshaw Common and Pipehill Common.

The students have learned about how these rare environments are cared for and maintained and has given them practical advice on issues such as how to keep overgrown scrub under control.

Justine Lloyd, Countryside Officer for Lichfield District Council, said:

“On a vocational course it is really important to have a hands-on experience in the profession you are training for. That is why we were pleased to offer our services to help the next generation of nature conservationists. The group was really keen to learn from us and asked us plenty of questions about what it is like to work in nature conservation.”

Eleanor Atkins, Countryside Management Course Tutor at South Staffordshire College, Rodbaston Campus, added:

“This was a great chance for my students to gain some firsthand experience and talk to professionals within their chosen field.”

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Founder of LichfieldLive and editor of the site.

1 Comment

  1. chris faulkner

    14th March, 2010 at 3:10 am

    considering what has been agreed recently involving chasewater and the new bypass the fact the council is claiming to help conservation is nothing short of a farce.