Crime Commissioner insists technology will ensure bobbies spend more time on the beat in Lichfield and Burntwood

Technology will ensure bobbies spend more time on the beat in Lichfield and Burntwood, according to Staffordshire’s Police and Crime Commissioner.

All frontline officers, PCSOs and Specials have smartphone and tablet devices to complete paperwork on the go, with a new update allowing them to also search records remotely.

Sgt Tyrone Kerr with one of the new mobile devices issued to officers in Staffordshire

Sgt Tyrone Kerr with one of the new mobile devices issued to officers in Staffordshire

Police and Crime Commissioner Matthew Ellis says the roll-out of the technology will create a more visible presence on the area’s streets.

“These new processes mean officers can spend less time on admin in a police station and more time in the communities they serve,” he said. “It’s early days, but the feedback I’ve had from officers about this new technology has been positive. They’re amazed at how good the technology is and the potential it has to free them up to out of police stations and on the streets.

“Over the next 12 months, police visibility will rise because of this new technology. When fully bedded in, it will help free up an extra 250,000 hours of police time to be out on the beat each year across the county, which is the equivalent of an extra 100 officers on duty.

“It is pioneering work that puts us ahead of the majority of forces in the country, but more importantly we are taking a significant step to delivering the kind of policing local people tell me they want and need.

“This is part of wider investment in technology that will dramatically improve Staffordshire Police’s intelligence capability and make it the most efficient, agile and effective police force in the country.

“It’s not about how much money is spent, but how well it is spent.”

The force has also rolled out a new GPS system which it says will improve response times by giving control rooms access to real-time information on the location of each vehicle.

Deputy Chief Constable Nick Baker said: “Policing needs to keep pace with developments in technology and harness the advantages they bring.

“We have to look critically at everything we do and look for ways to work smarter and more efficiently.

“Change is the only constant in policing and the introduction of mobile devices will not be the last time we alter the way we do things.”

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