Wayne Smith

A Mile Oak man who drove at speeds of 100mph with a child in his vehicle before crashing into a police car and causing it to catch fire has been jailed.

Wayne Smith, 27, assaulted a woman at an address in Tamworth on 4th August last year.

He then drove her child 260 miles to Cornwall in the early hours of the following day.

Officers from Avon and Somerset Police found the car driving along there M5. When they tried to stop the vehicle near Weston-super-Mare, Smith drove at marked police 4×4, causing to to overturn several times before landing on its roof.

A police officer was trapped in the vehicle as it caught fire. He was rescued, but suffered head injuries and PTSD.

The child was found in the foot well of Smith’s vehicle.

He was jailed for 16 months for dangerous driving, two months for assault by beating and eight months for assault/ill-treat/neglect/abandon a child/young person likely to cause unnecessary suffering/injury.

He was also sentenced to five months for assault a person thereby occasioning them actual bodily harm to run concurrently. 
 
He was acquitted of false imprisonment and sexual assault.
 
Detective Constable Martin Ottey said:

“Smith took a young child without his mother’s knowledge and put its life at risk by driving extremely dangerously and reaching speeds way over the speed limit.
 
“He put the child, the officers and himself in danger and it’s a miracle no one was seriously injured. Despite his best efforts to get away, officers arrested him and he’s now been brought to justice for his actions.”

Det Cons Martin Ottey

Founder of Lichfield Live and editor of the site.

Join the Conversation

2 Comments

  1. All that damage, destruction and lawlessness… concurrent sentences are the bane of the criminal justice system.

  2. Totally agree Darryl. Also reduced sentencing, and plea bargaining at the last minute to reduce sentence is not justice for victims. Early release should be based on merit and safety only. If you do more than one crime they should carry consecutive prison terms.
    I suppose the size of the prison population is the factor determining the sentencing, together with the cost of such incarceration. What price justice?

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *